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7 Common Window Mistakes to Avoid this Christmas

by Francesca Coleman Carr

Christmas is one of the most magical times of the year and is certainly something the Sash Window family look forward too! However, this festive season also requires a significant amount of preparation. From purchasing gifts for all the family and preparing the Christmas turkey through to ensuring your sash windows are ready for the festivities. Yes, you read right, your sash windows also require preparation during this busy time of year.

Unfortunately, sash windows are often overlooked during the Christmas period and this can cause numerous problems for families over the holidays. So, I have written this article outlining the 7 most common window mistakes you should avoid this Christmas.

Unsecured Sash Windows

Burglar at Window

Everyone wants their home to be secure all year round but particularly during Christmas. Leaving your windows unsecured is a common mistake that has the potential to ruin your Christmas and leave your family with no gifts under the tree.

One of the most common points for a thief to enter your home is through the window. During the Christmas period, thefts are particularly high as family’s purchase, wrap and store presents under the tree. Therefore, during the Christmas period, it is more important than ever to ensure your windows are properly secured. For tips on how to increase the security of your sash windows, check out one of my previous articles here. Alternatively, at Sash Windows London, we offer multiple locks and window accessories to help keep your sash windows secure this Christmas.

Blocking Natural Light

Natural Sunlight

Natural light can be blocked from your home during the Christmas for numerous reasons such as thick drapery, furniture in front of the windows or even your Christmas tree proudly blocking the view! The days are already shorted during the Christmas period, so avoid making them even darker by blocking out natural light.

Although thick drapery can be beautiful and is a great insulator, it can prevent natural light from filtering into your home. Avoid hanging your curtains too low and instead increase the natural light by hanging your thick drapes as close to the ceiling as possible, tying them back either side of your windows to allow natural light to stream into the room during the day.

Forcing Open Stuck Sash Windows

Forcing Open Stuck Window

Have you ever struggled to open your sash windows? Forcing open stuck sash windows is a common mistake that must be avoided because it can cause significant damage such as broken cords and damaged frames. Although your sash windows may easily stick, jam or fail to move, in some cases rubbing beeswax along the sash window edges can help encourage free moving windows. However, if the problem is ongoing it is likely you require replacement sash windows.

Scratching Sash Window Glass

Scratches

With the excitement of Christmas, the tree pushed up against the window and hanging decorations, scratches on window panes are inevitable. Although scratching window panes is a common mistake during the Christmas season, it can often be easily fixed. Fine scratches can often be easily polished out with a soft cloth and a mild rubbing compound. For those deeper scratches (that you can catch your fingernail in if you run it across the glass), it is important you call in a specialist to remove the scratch for you.

Climbing Utility Bills

Utility Bills

Unfortunately, climbing utility bills during the Christmas season are often blamed on the company providers. However, your windows may be the culprit. Increased utility bills can be the result of hot air loss through your windows, causing climbing utility bills. If your bills are significantly high during the colder seasons, this could be a sign your windows need replacing. Energy loss during the Christmas season is a costly mistake that must be avoided at all costs.

You can help reduce energy loss from your home by thoroughly insulating your windows. Insulation dramatically reduces heat loss from your home by providing a protective barrier between the outside and inside of your home, keeping you warm and dry throughout the Christmas season at a fraction of the price. For more information on how to insulate your windows effectively for the winter, find out more here.

Condensation During Cooking

Condensation

When it comes time to cook your family the Christmas feast they have all be waiting for, condensation can be a problem. Condensation is especially common during the Christmas season as the heat inside your home reacts with the cold temperatures outside, forming condensation on your windows. Double and triple glazing can reduce this problem but single glazing does not provide a very effective barrier between the outside and inside of your home. Reduce the likelihood of excessive condensation on your lovely sash windows by following a few simple steps:

  • Open the windows while cooking to circulate fresh air.
  • Put the extractor fan on to ventilate the room.
  • Close the door to the kitchen to prevent steam and hot air travelling into other rooms of your home.
  • Make use of dehumidifiers to help reduce the humidity in your home.

If condensation continues to form on your windows, I would suggest wiping them down daily with a dry cloth to help them stay as dry as possible. This will reduce the risk of your wooden sash windows rotting over time due to excessive moisture. For more details and advice on how to reduce condensation in your home, find out more here.

Leave a Comment Below

I hope you have found this article useful and that it has given you some key preparation tips for your sash windows this Christmas. If you have any tips of your own, leave a comment below. I would love to hear your suggestions!

team francesca

Francesca is the Managing Director of Sash Windows London Ltd, a family-owned and professionally managed window company providing a full range of sash window products throughout the UK. Passionate about providing high-quality, friendly, and reliable services. You can read Francesca’s full bio here.

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